1. April 18, 1775: Paul Revere, William Dawes, and Dr. Samuel Prescott go on their famous Midnight Ride.

    This contemporaneous map was published in 1778 (although this particular copy is a facsimile). It shows British intel regarding “the Rebels Works” in the Boston area in 1775.

    MapPage, Thomas Hyde, Sir, 1746-1821. Boston, its environs and harbour, with the rebels works raised against that town in 1775, from the observations of Lieut. Page of His Majesty’s Corps of Engineers, and from the plans of Capt. Montresor.  [London] Wm. Faden, 1778. Ithaca, N.Y., Historic Urban Plans, [1974]

     
  2. April 17, 1961: The Bay of Pigs invasion began.

    This tourist map of Havana was published in 1949, 4 years prior to the start of the Cuban Revolution, which ended in 1959. The former owner of the map penciled in some personal destinations, including the location of the local Woolworth’s. Several yacht clubs can be seen near the military airport.

    MapMirabal, Rogelio L. Panoramic and monumental map of Havana = Plano panorámico y monumental de La Habana / by Rogelio L. Mirabal ; compliments of the Cuban Tourist Commission. Havana: Cuban Tourist Commission, 1949.

     
  3. The Map Collection Assistant, Paula, recently got this map art/letter in the mail. Very cool! A clever repurposing of flight lines.

     
  4. April 14, 1940: After Germany’s invasion of neutral Norway in early April, the British counter-attack began with the landing of Royal Marines in Namsos, Norway.

    Several Soviet prisons were built in Farsund during the course of the war, most of which functioned as labor camps for German POWs. 

    MapFarsund: plan of port and town / compiled and drawn by Inter-Service Topographical Department. [London]: War Office, 1944.

     
  5. April 10, 1944: The Red Army recaptured Odessa after several years of Romanian occupation.

    This map was produced in 1943, during the Romanian occupation, and was clearly intended to show German encroachment upon “Russia’s Ukraine” and its industrial centers.

    Map: Chapin, R. M. Russia’s Ukraine: Time map. [New York?] Time, 1943.

     
  6. This is too wonderful not to post! More information can be found here.

     
  7. mapsontheweb:

    San Serriffe is a fictional island nation created for April Fools’ Day, 1977, by Britain’s Guardian newspaper.

    An elaborate description of the nation, using puns and plays on words relating to typography (such as “sans-serif” and names of common fonts), was reported as legitimate news. Because typographic terminology had not yet spread through widespread use of desktop publishing and word processing software, these jokes were easily missed by the general public, and many readers were fooled.

    Map humor!

    (Source: geog.ucsb.edu)

     
  8. scarycatfish:

    uimapcoll:

    March 31, 1909: Construction began on the Titanic.

    A highly informative map depicting the crash location and other aspects of the RMS Titanic and its journey.

    Shockingly, Jack and Rose do not appear in the “Saved” and “Lost” categories…

    MapTitanic—reference map: the first complete map of the world’s most famous shipwreck : [North Atlantic Ocean] / HM ; Lynn Noel, editor ; Nat Case, cartographer ; Don Marietta, information graphics ; Jessica Buster, research assistant ; map and publication design by Hedberg Maps, Inc.  Minneapolis : Hedberg Maps Inc. ; Santa Barbara, CA : Map Link Inc., c1998.

    Contrary to common belief; Jack and Rose never existed. They are fictional characters. It wouldn’t make any sense to include them in the list of passengers.

    You are correct!

    Dry humor doesn’t work as well in print, does it?

    In all seriousness, though, check out some real survivor stories of the kind that don’t normally make it to the big screen, and the tales of a lucky few who missed the ship entirely.

    (via thewintercatfish)

     
  9. March 31, 1909: Construction began on the Titanic.

    A highly informative map depicting the crash location and other aspects of the RMS Titanic and its journey.

    Shockingly, Jack and Rose do not appear in the “Saved” and “Lost” categories…

    MapTitanic—reference map: the first complete map of the world’s most famous shipwreck : [North Atlantic Ocean] / HM ; Lynn Noel, editor ; Nat Case, cartographer ; Don Marietta, information graphics ; Jessica Buster, research assistant ; map and publication design by Hedberg Maps, Inc.  Minneapolis : Hedberg Maps Inc. ; Santa Barbara, CA : Map Link Inc., c1998.

     

  10. Another departure from our normal mapiversary format!

    Last week we received the Folio Society’s facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi (copy 541!).

    image

    The Folio Society paid a tremendous amount of attention to detail in creating the facsimile:

    The Hereford World Map has suffered over the years. Over seven hundred years of atmospheric corrosion have reduced its overall colouration to a murky brown. The blue pigment of rivers has flaked away, the green of the oceans darkened, while dirt has smudged and obscured the script and tarnished the gilding. To create this restored reproduction, The Folio Society has used digital technology to peel away the years and reveal, as much as possible, the glory of the medieval original. In it, the background vellum has been cleaned, lettering and drawings strengthened and, most strikingly, the original gilding and spectacular colouring of rivers and oceans have been restored. A careful analysis of pigments, comparison with other medieval maps and the expertise of consultants from the British Library and the Bodleian Library have all been employed to inform the reproduction. To prevent more damage occurring in the future, special light-fast inks have been used. This is by no means an attempt to recreate the original in every particular – some detail is lost for ever – but it is the most authentic version possible.

    The trustees of Hereford Cathedral have placed the Folio Society limited edition on permanent display beside the original. This will permit generations of future visitors to examine the map in detail and gain an appreciation of its former glory.

    image

    Stop by and see the University of Iowa’s facsimile in all its current glory!